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what's up

Welcome to slackingoff, where we have in-depth conversations on whatever is particularly interesting. Follow below.

march of the times 👊

march of the times 👊

ameet
What's up Anthony.

anthony
Just catching up on the news.

anthony
Busy weekend in DC huh?

ameet
You could say that:

ameet

ameet
It was a busy weekend on Instagram too.

anthony
I saw this on my timeline and newsfeed but I didn't think it was going to be this big.

ameet
Seriously, I spoke to some people who marched and very few of them had any conception of the scale. Check this out:

ameet
Vox
The Women's Marches may have been the largest demonstration in US history
We mapped it.

ameet

Every state in America hosted a Women’s March, as you can see in the map above. The events ranged from tiny gatherings in small town squares to throngs of more than 500,000 people clogging streets in cities like Washington, DC, and Los Angeles.


ameet
It's pretty incredible that this movement mobilized across the country in only a few months. I'd consider that a testament to the organizational power of social media.

anthony
Yes. Interesting to see how big and widespread this became. The common criticism of social media activism is the empty gestures of liking a photo or retweeting a post. This was different with those 3MM+ people marching on Saturday.

ameet
That's a lot of fucking people. Do you think that the social media efforts and virality kind of multiplied the turnout and visibility?

anthony
Yeah social media definitely helped make this a bigger event, but these are issues that directly effect a broad swath of people. I think there would have been a big turnout if this happened in a pre-social media world.

ameet
You know what's interesting about that? In a pre-social media world it's possible that we might have not known about this protest or its coverage would have been minimized. Because of social media we were able to get first-hand on-the-ground impressions of Black Lives Matter and the protests in Ferguson and the Women's March without the help of any traditional media.

anthony
They must have learned from President Trump. He did the same thing by talking directly to his supporters. While his Twitter feed may come off as unpredictable, his Twitter feed gave his supporters what they wanted. As a result, he was able to ride his supporters directly into the White House.

anthony
Even Trump's alternative facts-embracing press secretary realizes the importance of talking to his supporters:
hughhewitt.com
The Hugh Hewitt Show
Sean Spicer On The New Administration And The Press « The Hugh Hewitt Show
Sean Spicer joined me this morning.  The incoming White House Director of Communications and Press Secretary and I covered a lot of ground on the new presi

ameet
Speaking of those "American people", they are a very interesting blend of old and new media:

ameet
Quartz
“Alternative facts”: 1 in 5 American newspapers ignored the Women’s March
A Quartz analysis of almost 450 newspapers archived by the Newseum found that more than 22% didn’t even even mention the protests on their Sunday front pages. Another 27% mentioned the protests, but did not make them their lead story.

ameet
While these guys might be happy to follow President Trump's latest ramblings on Twitter, they also tend to get their news from very traditional sources that still shape their worldview. As a result it's possible that in their universe, the marches were minimized.

anthony
Let's not just make the assumption that these marches were minimized, rural Americans were aware of these nationwide marches:
nytimes.com
The New York Times
In a Rust Belt Town, the Women’s March Draws Shrugs and Cheers From Afar
Women in Niles, Mich., 600 miles from Washington, disagreed on the need for the march and on the issues it focused on.

anthony

Angie Searles, 45, perked up at the mention. “Oh, I just saw that on the news,” she said. “I don’t know anyone who’s going.”


anthony
People are actively self selecting what they want to read and react to. There is something around how social media is bringing more of the same like minded people together while ignoring the other side. Traditional media still plays an important role, but these grassroots efforts are taking a more important role in setting the agenda.

ameet
This was pretty well-illustrated last week. On January 20 during the Inauguration, there were crowds of people with red #MAGA hats on. The next day there was a sea of protesters carrying signs with vaginas on them.


It's possible that those two groups were independently galvanized by social media but might never actually see each other, in social media or real life. Even in this "more open and connected world" you are still ultimately driven by your own pre-existing worldview.


anthony
Yep. These social platforms need to come to grips that they are shaping people's reality and worldviews. It is tough to have meaningful debate when all you see is slight variations of you own beliefs.

ameet
It's not just the social platforms; it's down to the users (us) to be aware of what's happening, and to take actionable next steps. Ultimately this social media-driven movement will be for naught unless there's follow through.

anthony
They are definitely playing the long game with their 100 day plan:
https://www.womensmarch.com/
Women's March on Washington
10 Actions / 100 Days
Thank you to the millions of people around the world who, on January 21, came together to raise our voices. But our march forward does not end here. Now is the time to get our friends, family and community together and MAKE HISTORY. Join us in launching a new campaign:  10 Actions for the first 100 Days. Donate

ameet

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burger with fees 🍔 🍟 💰

burger with fees 🍔 🍟 💰